top of page

My Manifesto

I have laid out my full manifesto within the 342 pages of my book:

                       
WHAT THE WORLD NEEDS NOW
  12 ESSENTIAL REFORMS FOR SURVIVING THE 21ST CENTURY.

          Here I will try to summarise its core principles and ideas:


 
It begins with a new way of looking at the political landscape and a basic question:

                                                    'what do we want of our society'


Of course each of us want different things depending on our own circumstances and at different times in our lives but on what merits could we all agree upon would make for a 'better' society?

Well, it turns out that there has been a series of studies that have tried to specifically answer that question. Many large organisation, The UN, global charities and government advisers all have more or less similar answers and they have become what we call 'human development indices'. It has become a way of measuring a developing country's progress in terms of turning their tax revenues into societal achievements and there are main categories like healthcare, education, levels of democracy, justice, economic factors like wages and cost of living, infrastructure and others. Now, 'development' may sound like we are ready to pave over paradise so as I have ventured into the study of this subject and have concluded by describing 12 main areas of 'human well-being' for people in society. There are some really detailed formulas but it can be abbreviated -HWix12. 

My initial concern was to try to describe the nature of our individual relationship to society and what we have collectively manifested as the institutions that we see around us today but what I quickly realised is that when you look at all we have in place and measure it against this gage for what we expect to have in place we can quickly see where we are falling short. When you look at society through the prism of HWix12 you can quickly see 1) in what ways we need to better organise ourselves 2) what is to be achieved through collaboration and agreement as opposed confrontation in the political landscape and 3) how quickly and efficiently we can start making real effective change.

The very principle that society is there to help us collectively best achieve better lives for ourselves and that we play our part in that social contract then becomes a moral endeavour and it is therefore my conclusion that this idea represents a whole new branch of political philosophy. For this reason I have come to give it a name - POLITICAL HUMANISM. I describe it as a post-Utilitarian position because it precisely describes what 'better' looks like on the Utilitarian principles of 'what maximises well-being to people in society'.

Now, I hope that makes some sense to you. I hope that you see that it completely changes how we look at the political landscape because there is no longer any need to describe what is of the 'right wing' - Neo-liberalism which serves only those with the most wealth and on the 'left wing' the failed ideologies of Marxism. We no longer have need to place all political thought along a spectrum between two failed or failing ideas when we can simply ask 'will this policy achieve a better result for what the people want', as defined by HWix12.

I believe that Political Humanism will only grow as an agreeable idea and will become the next big rallying point for enforcing rapid social change on the institutions of governance. 

This is because, regardless of your standing in society, you are looking at principles of common agreement in order to realise the best possible result for all and therefore the process itself is one of collaboration and not of conflict. 'The Common Good' then becomes the single rallying principle in order to start the process of change that will create the kind of society we all want.

The process itself can be easily summarised as - TWELVE GREAT REFORMS

1 DEMOCRATIC REFORM

2 CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM

3 EXECUTIVE POWERS REFORM

4 REGULATORY REFORM

5 TAX SYSTEN REFORM

6 MONEY SYSTEM REFORM

7 ECONOMIC REFORM

8 JUSTICE REFORM

9 HEALTH REFORM

10 EDUCATION REFORM

11 ANTHROPOCENE REFORM

12 GLOBAL RELATIONS REFORM





 
bottom of page